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The TikTok and Instagram interior trends putting home buyers off

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They may be the biggest trends of 2022 according to social media, but when it comes to selling, are they actually reducing the chance of a sale?

Social media sites like Instagram and TikTok are invaluable for uncovering new interior design trends and helpful tips on how to add aesthetic value to your living space. As well as living in a home that’s pleasing to the eye, these trends may also bring with them an additional financial value when it comes to selling the property. 

But, which of these social media design trends will actually add value to a property on the market and what brings down the value of a house? We spoke to Marco Helliwell, founder of mypropertyadvice.com and Sylvia James, interior design expert at Homehow, to understand which of this year’s biggest interior trends are impacting the chances of a sale.

“Social media is a double-edged sword in terms of interior design”, says Sylvia. “It’s ideal for sharing ideas between enthusiastic homeowners and renovators, but although it’s great for providing endless inspiration, it can’t provide amateurs with the skills they need to create a cohesive room or a good finish.”

Decorating trends to avoid if you’re selling your home

Bringing nature inside

Born out of the want to slow down and reconnect with nature, this trend looks at adding natural materials like rattan and bamboo to the home, as well as filling it with light furnishings and lots – we mean lots – of plants. In some cases, this has also involved fish ponds and water features being added to the property.

On this trend, Marco comments: “Always get planning before doing any major structural changes to your home otherwise a buyer could find that there isn’t permission when doing their searches and this could make the sale fall through or they force a price drop.

 

Maximalism

The exact opposite of the Scandinavian and Japanese forms of minimalism, this trend sees all available wall and floor space used to its full potential. Think busy gallery walls, mis-matched furniture, loud and bright wallpaper, and lots of colours.

Marco says: “If your styling is so busy that a potential buyer can’t see the basics of a room or house then this could prevent people even booking in a viewing, so be careful how things translate to small photos on an online listing.”

Syvlia agrees: “An array of colours and styles can be quite overwhelming and hard for buyers to see past. Basically, a buyer wants to be able to picture themselves living in your home. So, you need to make it easy for them to do that.”

 

Black is the new beige

What may seem a small change, simply painting certain parts of your home in bold black rather than the typical neutral shades, could actually be very off-putting for potential buyers. Sylvia comments: “Drenching rooms in dark hues creates a very distinctive interior, which is not to every buyer’s taste. Some buyers may be looking for a light and airy home, so you’re limiting your options. This is why the tried and tested advice is to keep things neutral.”

Marco adds: “Really think about how these black features translate to small listing images, and make sure the lighting is good when you take the pictures otherwise you will lose interest from the first look.”

 

Curves – ceilings, arches and furniture

While rounded fixtures and fittings might seem a fun and retro alternative to classic lines and traditional shapes of walls and doors, it could easily put off potential buyers. “If it’s not in keeping with the original style of the property then it can be a big risk”, says Marco. “If you’re thinking of doing this to a small room then it could work against you when selling.”

 

Colourful kitchens

The kitchen is the heart of the home, and a room that has – since the pandemic – become a focal point of many Zoom meetings. Rather than using the blur feature on most virtual meetings platforms, many have instead decided to zhuzh up their kitchens by adding bright tiles or wallpaper, or totally re-invigorating tired cupboards with vibrant colours.

But Marco warns: “Be careful when doing anything that is expensive to undo. If you’re decorating your house to sell, and not for you to stay in long-term, I would stay away from making any design choices that are too bold in the kitchen. Keep it simple.

 

The interior trends that are always in fashion

It’s not all doom and gloom, as Marco and Sylvia assure us that there are plenty of updates you can make to your homes that are always in fashion, and will have no negative impact on the sale of your property and may even add more value when selling.

Japandi style

Japandi is an interior style that is an aesthetically-pleasing marriage between simplicity and nature with the common interest of minimalism, bringing the best from two different sides of the globe – Scandinavia and Japan. The look is minimal, functional, warm, and calming.

“Japandi and naturalism trends are bound to slowly evolve. But because they take in neutral tones and natural materials, and have a focus on sustainability, they’ll likely stand the test of time in general terms,” says Sylvia.

 

Keeping original features

Retaining the style and grandeur of properties from the time they were built is something that many buyers will thank you for – especially as many are looking to buy a lifestyle as well as a home. “If you do a really great job with this one, you might even get people asking to buy the furniture too!” Marco adds.

He continues: Mantel pieces in period properties are timeless, along with fireplaces, sash windows and shutters are some of the features buyers are looking for in older homes. If you bring back a property to have its original features such as cornicing, Victorian tiling in hallways and leading up to the house, these things are part of the original styling of the property so will always give you a good basis to attract buyers.

 

Bright, open conservatories

As we spend more time in our homes there is a thirst for natural light; bright, open spaces are not only fashionable but also really important for our mental and physical wellbeing. Having a conservatory to provide large swathes of natural light is great for houseplants, as well as for our general vitamin D intake. 

Marco adds: “Conservatories are a huge bonus for families and people working at home more. They can also help make smaller properties feel bigger and more spacious which makes them seem significantly more attractive. They are fast becoming the go-to way of getting more space to a property without going through the laborious process of planning.”

 

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